VHS Massacre Too (Currently in festivals)

VHS Massacre Too is Infused with nostalgia, humor and passion…  without a doubt worth watching!”

-Jay Kay, HorrorHound Magazine

 (drop me a line if you are interested in having VHS Massacre Too screen at your film festival!)

So some very cool things have happened since my last update. My new documentary feature VHS Massacre Too has made some progress in the film festival circuit garnering eleven awards and five nominations in various categories from Best Documentary to Best Editing (see awards list below). Some upcoming screenings include  Bare Bones Film Festival , HorrorCon UK. We are still waiting to hear back from about 20 other film festivals so more news to come! Also we will screen at the Underground Indie Film Festival virtually on Saturday June 13th.

    • New Filmmakers New York
      New York, NY
      United States
      January 8, 2020
      Sneak Peek
      Official Selection
    • HorrorHound Film Festival
      Cincinnati, OH
      United States
      March 20, 2020
      World Premiere
    • The Independent Horror Movie Awards
      Awards Competition
      January 1, 2020
      Winner: Best Documentary
    • The Independent Horror Movie Awards
      Awards Competition
      January 1, 2020
      Winner: Best Editing
    • The Independent Horror Movie Awards
      Awards Competition
      January 1, 2020
      Nomination: Best Music
    • Miami International Science Fiction Film Festival
      Miami
      United States
      March 31, 2020
      Florida Premiere
      WINNER: Best Documentary
    • Bare Bones International Film Festival
      Muskogee, OK
      United States
      April 25, 2020
      Oklahoma Premiere!
      Best Documentary Nomination (currently in competition)
    • Top Indie Awards Film Competition
      Awards Competition
      United States
      January 25, 2020
      WINNER: Best Documentary Feature
    • Top Indie Awards Film Competition
      Awards Competition
      United States
      January 25, 2020
      Nomination: Best Director
    • Top Indie Awards Film Competition
      Awards Competition
      United States
      January 25, 2020
      Nomination: Best Editing
    • Impact Documentary Awards
      La Jolla, CA
      United States
      January 27, 2020
      WINNER: Documentary Feature
    • The IndieFest Film Competition
      Los Angeles
      United States
      February 2, 2020
      WINNER: Documentary Feature
    • Los Angeles Independent Film Festival Awards
      Los Angeles
      United States
      August 1, 2020
      Best Documentary Semifinalist
    • Los Angeles Independent Film Festival Awards
      United States
      August 1, 2020
      Best Director Semifinalist
    • Accolade Global Film Competition
      Los Angeles
      United States
      March 25, 2020
      Winner: Best Documentary
    • Horrorcon UK
      Magna, Sheffield
      United Kingdom
      September 26, 2020
      European Premiere
      Currently in competition
    • 41st Annual Telly Awards
      New York
      United States
      May 27, 2020
      National Awards Show Premiere
      WINNER: Best Documentary
    • 41st Annual Telly Awards
      New York
      United States
      May 27, 2020
      National Awards Show Premiere
      WINNER: Best low-budget project
    • Underground Indie Film Festival
      Apopka, FL
      United States
      June 13, 2020
      City Premiere
      WINNER: Best Documentary
    • Underground Indie Film Festival
      Apopka, FL
      United States
      June 13, 2020
      City Premiere
      WINNER: Audience Choice Award
    • Los Angeles Underground Film Forum
      Los Angeles
      United States
      June 17, 2020
      Honorable Mention Laurel

On a side note HorrorHound was one of the three horror magazines (including Fangoria and Rue Morgue) that I read growing up so it was really great to be included in their convention and festival screening! At the end of the day for most American low-budget features, film festivals serve as our theatrical run. This has sort of taken the place of four-walling, when you’d bring your film to one city, promote the local screening and then move to the next city. To some degree the math doesn’t work on four-walling anymore, advertising is expensive and film attendance is down. I think Kevin Smith can pull it off with his special events but its harder if you aren’t already famous. So film festivals are a way you can get your movie played on the big screen. There is risk of course. You have to shell out some money.

A good scenario would be to get accepted to a third of the festivals you enter, so it’s not sure bet by any standard. Certain festivals like Sundance take 14,000 submissions a year and probably only play a few hundred films. So it may be smarter to avoid “bankrolling” certain festivals that play mostly studio releases. In the next few months the results of World-fest Houston the, Webby Awards and the Telly Awards will be in and I’m hoping VHS Massacre Too will do well. I did end up entering Austin Film festival. It’s one of the Top festivals in the world. I can’t seem to totally extinguish this desire to “buy a lottery ticket” if you will. But I couldn’t enter Sundance and Slamdance one more time, I actually felt ill when considering giving my money to those studio film festivals. Dreams shift as you get older. Artists need to create their work to feel normal or navigate the world and all its challenges. So I know I need to keep creating but I also want to get the work seen. That’s my goal these days, complete solid work, offer it to an audience and move on to the next thing.

April 2019 UPDATES!

The great news is that over the last month I’ve gotten some really solid interviews. James Rolfe a filmmaker known as the Angry Video Game Nerd has joined the cast of VHS Massacre 2. The views on his web-series are literally in the billions. He made his first feature a few years back and I got to hear about how that process went.

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The next person to join the film is independent film juggernaut and film reviewer Shawn C. Phillips. With over a 130 movie credits, he has carved out a solid career but also his physical media collection is really amazing! His insights into the value of exploitation films are really powerful as well!

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Lastly but certainly not least Mr. J.R. Bookwalter, that man whose first feature was funded by Sam Raimi (The Dead Next Door). He has worked on so many Full Moon classics that it will make your head spin. For instance Witch House 2,3, Curse of Puppet Master and so on! He’s had a great career and his expertise in independent film distribution is a really important in regard to this film. A few more interviews, some B-roll and I should have enough material to finished VHS Massacre 2! Hopefully toward the end of next year. With the success of the first VHS Massacre, it is my hope that I continue to work in the documentary field.

Jan. 2019 UPDATES!

As the new year begins a few things are starting to fall into place. My new feature length documentary VHS Massacre 2 is coming along slowly but I’m making steady progress. I just finished a great interview with my friend Jason Carvey. He is a writer/director that cast John Krasinksi (The Office,Jack Ryan) in one of his first feature films. Carvey speaks about how certain distribution companies have really hurt independent filmmakers. Even when a film is profitable sometimes the distribution company refuses to honor their contract and pay filmmakers. I had the same situation happen to me with the film Land of College Prophets back in 2005. The film was successful but York Entertainment refused to pay us once they reached the break even point. If you can’t pay back your investors it can become difficult to raise more money again. This in a weird way works as a form of censorship though this is not necessarily the intention of a crooked distributor or the studio system. By financially starving out independent filmmakers “society will eventually lose out” to quote my friend Professor James Richardson.

This is different than banning a film from major streaming sites like in the case of Debbie Rochon’s Model Hunger. This is particularly bizarre in that I can watch films like Human Centipede 1-3 or a Lars Von Trier film on most formats but simply because Debbie has an unrated film from a smaller distributor, they lack the power and influence get it though. The third piece of this would be the outraged mobs on social media helped to get Debbie fired from her day job for playing evil nazi villains or doing nudity in films, something that even academy award winners have done like Christoph Waltz, Holly Berry or even Charlie Chaplin. With nearly 300 features under her belt Debbie Rochon might be the most prolific American Independent film star in history…and she has been treated like shit. She is a trailblazer for women in the genre and routinely tops lists of women in horror. To paraphrase her, “the judgement I get from a seemly younger generation is baffling.” Looking down on her for the roles she has taken. A bizarre twist to me that they can’t see a hero from a villain.

Exploitation films are meant to do what studio films can’t, push the envelope. Specifically in the horror genre that idea of a non-offensive nightmare seems rather toothless. After all we see horror film to be scared and shocked in a safe way. Odd that people would try to hold horror films to the same standard as a terrible network sitcom. This documentary has led me down some strange path but I think it is a good thing.

Then there was Blockbuster Video. Jason speaks how in order to get certain films into Blockbuster, films at times were heavily censored. In addition that fact that Blockbuster killed the independently owned video stores is a from of censorship because they only carried family friendly content. Exploitation films and low-budget content was to a significant degree excluded.

What I see from these three forms of censorship is problematic. What tiggers people now might not be what triggers people ten years from now. So in destroying a filmmakers career on social media, we may lose out on how we may reinterpret a film in the future or we may lose out on how that artist evolves. James speaks about how black exploitation films of the 70’s planted the seeds for Marvel Superheroes in present day. Even though the representations are imperfect and in some cases offensive we can look back and see that they are very important. If we look back at the past and cringe a bit, it is a good thing because it means that we’ve made progress. If we demonize the past by the standards of today the whole world looks evil though that lens. The problem is what we’re doing in 2019 will be demonized in five years as well but we don’t yet know how. How do you know you are the right side of history until the future bear its results. So I don’t think censorship good for a society in the long run. Take what is relevant and meaningful from the past, leave what is irrelevant where it originated, in the past. As of right now that that feels true to me. As the film unfolds I hope to learn more.

We are currently shooting interviews for EX Massacre, a follow up to the 5 time award winning documentary VHS Massacre! VHS Massacre was distributed by FilmRise and Troma Entertainment who is currently in production with Legendary Pictures!

UPDATE! 2018

So I’m working on the follow up to the VHS Massacre documentary with Kenneth Powell. That film was shot from early 2012 until 2014 and released in 2016. A lot has changed since then and lately I’ve been trying to put my finger on it. Recently we got some great footage from the Last Blockbuster in the U.S. located in Bend, Oregon courtesy of producer Tom Poirier. It made me think of how Blockbuster starved out independent video stores and in turn, they starved out a number of exploitation filmmakers. You couldn’t see certain films that pushed the envelope in most Blockbuster Videos. For the most part Troma films, rare films, certain exploitation films and adult films were simply not available. Blockbuster was a family store and so they just didn’t carry certain titles. They certainly wanted to monopolize the industry and I think a side result was a deep censoring of certain films to the public and that is never good. So just as people got the freedom for the first time to rent the films at a reasonable price, certain films was quickly excluded. In a new interview I spoke with my friend Professor James Richardson about his favorite exploitation films and why they were important.

So now that Blockbuster Video is in the past (sort of) what has changed? I’d say independent films are being starved out in a different way. Be it through predatory distribution contracts that never pay out, being banned or blocked from premier streaming sites, or simply being paid pennies on the dollar from YouTube. (I once calculated that you have the same odds of playing in the NBA versus making six figures a year on YouTube) to make things worse YouTube recently kicked thousands of channels off of the partnership program cutting them out of the money making process altogether. In a recent interview with Debbie Rochon she speaks of her horror film Model Hunger being banned from major streaming sites because of graphic violence. Ironically I can watch all of the Human Centipede films on various formats. Why is this? Money and influence of course. Even though Debbie Rochon’s film model hunger starred horror icon Lynn Lowry (Crazies,Shivers),  it was low budget and so it was harder to push back.

Lloyd Kaufman himself will tell you that Netflix was built on the backs of low-budget filmmakers like Debbie or Troma Studios and their nearly 1,000 available titles. I even had a few titles on Netflix like Land of College Prophets in there in early 2000’s. Now of course we have all been kicked out. We were good enough for them as they were building their company but now they don’t need us. This a theme that seems to repeat over and over for indie filmmakers. So right now Prime Video and iTunes still have their door open to independent content so that is a light at the end of the tunnel. Though Prime to me is more promising. They have a massive subscriber base and there may be more of a chance that people hear about your film on the web and watch it on Prime without paying a separate rental fee.

So the new doc is going to be about modern censorship of Independent and exploitation films. We may dabble with origin of film censorship in the U.S. for instance the banning films of prize fighting films in the late 19th century, pre-code and post-code and so on. The main focus however will talk about the risks of making exploitation film today. Ex Massacre I’m calling the film. I have about 40 minutes roughed out but I need some more interviews for sure. I’m starting to book them now.

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All this to say I’m excited to be working on a new project and still grateful for the response to my last feature length documentary VHS Massacre. To be honest that’s why I’m doing the new one! There are still people who post pictures, videos, tweet or even drop us a line to tell us they liked the film. This has been happening for about three years now. To have ANY lasting impact in 2018 to me feels like a miracle.

I went to New York Comic Con this year. I stop by the Troma Entertainment booth every time I attend. Mostly because I’m a fan. I like to pick out a few new blu-rays I’ve never heard of. Some times they are pretty out there and offensive but sometimes I honestly like to be shocked. You are watching a spectacle and that can be exciting! I wouldn’t want to censor that. It’s easy enough to avoid material like that and that’s a powerful form of protest to simply not buy or watch more of those films. So it upsets me when people try to go after filmmakers on social media. It crosses the line of trying to destroy the person rather than boycott the art. Some films should be fucked up, if that freedom becomes censored through the government or even worse, the public, then ours is a republic in crisis… and we may be there already.

That being said thanks to everyone for making VHS Massacre possibly one of the best received films of my career! The last time I spoke with Lloyd Kaufman he said that VHS Massacre was a best seller for Troma Entertainment. The last time that happened to me was about 15 years ago for a film called Land of College Prophets. Thanks ya’ll! Happy Thanks Giving! More to come soon!

More news to come!