VHS Massacre wins at the 39th annual Telly Awards!

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UPDATE: 5/30/18: Hunter College gave me a little write-up for my participation in the 38th annual Telly Awards here!

 

VHS Massacre, a feature length documentary that I directed with Ken Powell about the decline of physical media picked up a Silver Telly Award in the Non-broadcast (under $700 a minute) category and a bronze in both the Documentary and Entertainment Non-broadcast categories. It’s so cool that New York Cinema Productions which really just consists of me at this point can hang in there with the likes of PBS, HBO, National Geographic and so on. Watch the film on Amazon Prime , iTunes, GooglePlay or on Blu-ray!

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When I was younger and working at CBS I had heard about he Telly Awards but back then in the late 1990’s it was more exclusively for broadcast and that meant that this type of award was not particularly accessible for an independent filmmaker. At CBS and NBC we all knew about the Regional Emmy and the Telly Awards. For many of us it was something to aspire to. In 2007 I was working for Black20 Studios (that was eventually sold to FOX). They specialized in internet videos featuring some impressive young performers and filmmakers like Amy Schumer, Eric Andre, Aubrey Plaza. I was camera operator on a show directed by Mike Aransky of IGN fame. That show net_work ended up getting a Broadband, Daytime Emmy nomination through (of all places) Myspace. The Daytime Emmy’s, probably in response to awards shows like the Webbys, wanted to adapt to the changing times. So what does this have to do with VHS Massacre? Well recently the Tellys have added additional categories that open up the show more to non-broadcast and streaming content. So the Tellys like others awards has changed with the times.

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When I made VHS Massacre for Troma Studios, it really was a love letter to Troma, Lloyd Kaufman and the gang for altering how I saw cinema. They had a powerful combination of comedy, horror and the grotesque. It opened my mind to the idea that you could blend genres, you could be unrestricted by censors and you could still make a solid point. The Toxic Avenger could easily been seen as an environmental film for instance. So the idea that making a film about Troma, B-movies and the video store era could win awards was not in my head. I just believed in idea and wanted to make it. So these Telly Awards mean a lot to me. Thanks to everyone involved including Producer and Composer Timothy Kulig, Ken Powell, Stephanie Perez and the rest of the gang! Long live Troma!

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